General
Info
Modes
Granular Processor
Pitch Shifter / Time Stretch
Looping Delay
Spectral Processor

General

Info

Clouds

Clouds is a multi-function granular audio processor by Mutable Instruments.

Links

Clouds Home
Clouds Manual


Modes

Granular Processor

Mode

Controls

Press to freeze buffer / hold to reverse

position

size

pitch



density

texture

blend

Blend Parameters

Dry/Wet
Stereo Spread
Feedback
Reverb


Pitch Shifter / Time Stretch

Mode

Controls

loop

position

size

pitch



granular
difffusion

LP <filter> BP

blend

Blend Parameters

Dry/Wet
Stereo Spread
Feedback
Reverb


Looping Delay

Mode

Controls

loop / hold to reverse loop

time /
loop start

loop length

pitch



difffusion

LP <filter> BP

blend

Blend Parameters

Dry/Wet
Stereo Spread
Feedback
Reverb


Spectral Processor

Mode

Controls

POSITION = selects in which buffer the audio is poured (when FREEZE is not active), or from which buffer the audio is synthesised (when FREEZE is active).

Example:
Set POSITION to minimum value. FREEZE. You get a first texture. Set POSITION to maximum value. UNFREEZE. Wait for something else to happen in the incoming audio. FREEZE again. By moving POSITION you interpolate between the two textures which had been captured at the press of FREEZE. Depending on the quality settings there are 2 to 7 buffers laid out on the course of the POSITION knob. So it's a bit like morphing between FFT slices.

SIZE = change the coefficients of a polynomial that determines how frequencies are mapped between the analysis and synthesis buffers. It's like a 1-knob GRM Warp. Over the course of the knob it'll do spectral shifting, but also spectral reversal.

PITCH = pitch-shifting.

DENSITY determines how results from the analyzer are passed to the resynthesizer. Below 12 o'clock, there's some increasing probability that a given FFT bin won't get updated, causing a kind of partial freeze. After 12 o'clock, adjacent analysis frames are increasingly merged together (like a low-pass filter in the amplitude each frequency bin). At extreme settings, random phase modulation is applied to smooth things - giving you different flavours of spectral muddling/reverb.

TEXTURE does two things: below 12 o'clock, it increasingly quantize the amplitudes of the spectral components, like a very low-bitrate audio file (a long time ago I loved making super harsh noise textures by loading text files as raw audio files in an audio editor... then encoding as mp3 or real audio with super low bitrate to make it sound like some underwater brian eno). After 12 o'clock, it increasingly weakens the strongest partials and amplifies the weakest ones. This has the effect of making the spectrum more noise-like.

- Émilie Gillet, via Muffwiggler